2019-01-18

Episode 049 -- Stroke in Children with Dr. Heather Fullerton


Many folks are surprised to find out adults in their 20s, 30s, and 40s can have stroke. What's often bigger news to people is that adolescents, children, newborns, and even fetuses can have a stroke. In fact, stroke in the womb is one of the leading causes of cerebral palsy.

Stroke in kids was nothing I had never even thought about before I started this journey to learn more about my own brain injury.

This week, I talk with one of the leading experts in childhood stroke. Strokecast regular, Dr. Nirav Shah, introduced me to Dr. Heather Fullerton. We had a fascinating conversation about stroke in children, the causes, and the generally optimistic recovery path.

Bio

Dr. Heather Fullerton headshot

Dr. Heather Fullerton is a pediatric vascular neurologist at UCSF, one of only a few child neurologists in the country with additional board certification in vascular neurology. She is the Kenneth Rainin Chair in Pediatric Stroke Care, Chief of Child Neurology at UCSF Department of Neurology, and director of the Pediatric Stroke and Cerebrovascular Research Group and Pediatric Brain Center at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital.

After graduating from Baylor College of Medicine in 1996, Dr. Fullerton came to UCSF for her pediatrics residency and child neurology fellowship, and then joined the child neurology faculty in 2002. Early in her training, she cared for a 2-year-old girl who suffered a stroke caused by a tear in a neck artery from a fall. After realizing the paucity of research in this field--and lack of child neurologists with expertise in stroke--she chose to dedicate her career to the care of such children.

She completed a vascular neurology fellowship between 2002 and 2003, and a two-year master's degree in clinical research at UCSF in 2005. She began doing clinical research in the field of childhood stroke, collaborating with renowned adult stroke researchers at UCSF. After starting a pediatric stroke clinic in 2002, she later established the multidisciplinary Pediatric Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center in 2006 and Pediatric Stroke and Cerebrovascular Research Group in 2009.

Dr. Fullerton’s research efforts have already improved the care of children with stroke. 

She has performed novel work identifying which children with stroke are at risk for suffering a recurrence. This information not only guides physicians in determining which high-risk children need preventative treatment, but also provides enormous reassurance to families of children with low recurrence risk. 

She led a groundbreaking study on risk factors for childhood stroke, determining that both minor acute infections and recent trauma are stroke and common risk factors.

She has also published work on pediatric arterial dissections, ethnic and gender disparities in childhood stroke risk, stroke rates in children with sickle cell disease, hemorrhagic stroke risk in children with arteriovenous malformations, and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children with vein of Galen malformations and PHACE syndrome.

She led an NIH-funded international study with 35-plus enrolling sites to better understand the association between childhood infections and ischemic stroke. She currently leads the part 2 of the said NIH-funded study to explore further analyses and test the overall hypothesis . She leads an AHA funded study on predicting stroke risk after minor trauma.

She also mentors junior investigators on a variety of other stroke related studies: stroke risk in childhood cancer survivors , stroke prevention in sickle cell disease, risk of epilepsy after stroke , the association between migraine and stroke in children, ADHD medications as a risk factor for stroke, and the role of atherosclerotic risk factors in stroke in children and young adults.

Tips for Living with a Child that Survived a Stroke

Dr. Fullerton offered these additional tips.

Don’t blame yourself. You will wrack your brain thinking of some way that you could have prevented your child’s stroke. You couldn’t. It was not your fault.

Enjoy your child for who they are, and know that their disability will make them a more empathetic person. A teenage survivor of a neonatal stroke once told me that if she could erase what had happened to her, and get rid of her disability, she wouldn’t. She knew it gave her a different lens for viewing others with disabilities, whether physical, intellectual, or social, and felt that made her a better person.

Hack of the Week

Using a phone one handed is certainly an option. As phones get bigger and we prefer to look at bigger screens, though, one handed uses is more challenging. You have reach further with your thumb to touch other parts of the screen or to tap out a text message, or really to use the functions you paid for.

And you have to do that without dropping it.

You can put the phone flat on a table, and that helps, but then the angle might be uncomfortable.

Instead, look for a dashboard or car window mount for your cell phone. You don't have to use them in a car. Usually they have a suction cup mount or a beanbag mount that you can use to hold your phone where you want it on your desk, coffee table, or other surface.

Then you can tap away at any part of the screen since you don't have to hold it in your hand.

BE FAST

Stroke symptom graphic

Where do we go from here?

  • What do think about the things Dr. Fullerton shared? Let us know in the comments below
  • Be sure folks who you know who are involved with kids know that stroke can happen
  • Share this episode by giving folks the link http://strokecast.com/pediatricstroke
    Consider a car mount to hold your cell phone on your desk, night stand, table, etc.
  • Don't get best…get better

 

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2019-01-15

Episode 096 -- Go the Extra Mile and Meet Shawn Anderson


2-Minute Tip: Go the Extra Mile

 

To create the life you want, go the extra mile every day in 3 separate ways.

 

First, go the extra mile for your health. What can you do today to live a more healthful life that you might be inclined not to do? Is it eating less junk? Getting a little more exercise? Tending to a nagging health issue you've been trying to ignore? Do this every day to help make sure your body can take you where you need to go. Getting healthier gives you more stamina on stage and makes it easier to control your breath.

 

Second, go the extra mile for someone else. It could be a friend, colleague, or relative. How can you help them in a way they did not expect? Can you help someone else with their talk? Or can you help them find another speaking opportunity?

 

Third, go the extra mile for your purpose or mission. How can you drive your personal mission forward? How can you get closer to your dreams? Make a little progress every day. What steps can you take to get closer to the speaking lifestyle you want to pursue?

 

Post Tip Discussion

 

This week, keynote speaker Shawn Anderson joined us to talk about his story and the importance of speaking from your heart. I first heard Shawn on Victoria Mavis's Pure Mind Magic podcast and was delighted when he popped over to 2-Minute Talk Tips a few weeks later.

 

I'm struck by the sheer volume of energy that Shawn brings to the show. He tells impressive stories, including how and why he came to speak to a bunch of students at a grade school in a village in the Philippines while standing outside getting soaked in the rain. It's easy to get caught up in the passion and emotion he brings to the things he says.

 

Bio

 

Shaw Anderson Head ShotShawn Anderson is a #1 ranked motivational author, unlimited thinker, and lifetime entrepreneur with a history of inspiring others. A seven-time author, Shawn is also the creator of Extra Mile Day...a day recognizing the power we each have to create positive change when we "go the extra mile." (On 11/1/18, 553 cities made the declaration and recognized local extra-mile heroes.)

 

Shawn walks his talk. Besides having inspired tens of thousands through his speaking and writing (including an inspirational speaking tour in the Philippines attended by 20,000 attendees), Shawn’s built a million dollar company, pedaled a bike solo across the U.S. (twice), and created adventures in 45+ countries including having walked across six countries in the last 4.5 years (England, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy and 750 miles around Shikoku, Japan.)

 

Still...he believes his greatest adventures and success are waiting to be lived.

 

 

Extra Mile Day & Extra Mile America History

 

In 2009, in order to symbolize the "go the extra mile" message, Shawn Anderson (a non-bicyclist) pedaled 4,000 miles ocean-to-ocean, interviewed 200+ people along the way whom had been identified as having gone the extra mile, and then gave $10,000 of his own money to the people and organizations whose stories most inspired him.

 

As a part of that cross-country extra-mile ride, Extra Mile Day (11/1)......a day recognizing the capacity we each have to create positive change in our families, our organizations, our communities and ourselves when we "go the extra mile"... was created with 23 inaugural cities.

 

The momentum of this unique day has continued to build each year since, and on November 1, 2018, 553 mayors and cities made the "Extra Mile Day" declaration and recognized people who are "going the extra mile" to make a difference in volunteerism and service in their community.

 

Links

 

 

Call to Action

 

  • What do you think of Shawn's story? Let us know in the comments below.
  • Check out Shaw's site at the link above.
  • Start your day by going the extra mile for health, people purpose.
  • Subscribe to 2-Minute Talk Tips for free in your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode.
  • Don't get best…get better.
     

Check out this episode!

2019-01-11

Episode 048 -- Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy with Dr. Michael Bennett


Stroke recovery is a marathon; it's not a sprint. Regaining cognitive skills, physical skills, sensory skills, and more takes time and work. During that time, life can be really hard and unpleasant for many folks. The may or may not be able to work. Relationships get turned upside down, and after a while you just want it to go away. Surely, with all the advances in medicine, there must be something…some fancy technology or machine…some magic technique that will fix these problems, right?

That leads folks to look for and explore alternatives. It also means that many survivors start pursuing things that don't work. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be one of those therapies. In Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, the patient spends time in a pressure chamber where the air pressure is 2-3X normal and breathes pure oxygen. They get roughly 8-12X as much oxygen as in their normal lives. This, supposedly, should grow new blood vessels in the brain and revive the dead neurons that were killed by the stroke, or drive new growth through neuroplasticity.

I saw a number of people asking about it in Facebook groups and twitter feeds, so I began talking with folks to learn more. Strokecast regular, neurologist Dr Nirav Shah, introduced me to one of the world's leading authorities on Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy, Dr. Mike Bennett in Australia.

This week I talk with Dr. Bennett about the theory and the research around hyperbaric medicine. We answer the key questions about it -- is it safe, and does it work.

The short version is that it is mostly safe, but there is no reliable research demonstrating that it works. The main risk is to the patient's wallet.

Bio

Dr. Mike Bennett headshotProfessor Bennett is the Academic Head of the Department of Anaesthesia, a Senior Staff Specialist in diving and hyperbaric medicine at Prince of Wales Hospital and Conjoint Professor in the faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He graduated from the University of New South Wales in 1979 and spent his early post-graduate training at the Prince Henry/Prince of Wales Hospitals before undertaking training in Anaesthesia in the UK.

He returned to Sydney in 1990 as a retrieval specialist on the Lifesaver Helicopter and here developed an interest in both diving and hyperbaric medicine. He also has a strong interest in clinical epidemiology and is an experienced clinician and researcher. In 2002 he was the recipient of the Behnke Award for outstanding scientific achievement from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

Since 2004 he has been highly involved in the teaching of Evidence-based Medicine within the Medical faculty at UNSW and in 2005 was appointed co-director of the Quality Medical Practice Program there. He is the author of over 150 peer-reviewed publications including 15 Cochrane reviews of the evidence in Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine.

Prof. Bennett was the convenor of the Australia and New Zealand Hyperbaric Medicine Group Introductory Course in Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine from its inception in 1999.to 2014. He is an executive member of the Australia and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) special interest group in diving and hyperbaric medicine, chief examiner for the ANZCA Certificate in diving and hyperbaric medicine and Chair of the ANZCA Scholar Role Subcommittee. He is a past Vice-President of the UHMS and currently the Past President of SPUMS.

Hack of the Week -- Rocker Knife

One handed steak knifeLast week, I talked about cutting meat at a restaurant -- don't. This week, let's talk about doing the same thing at home where you may not have a kitchen staff. Sure, at home you can just pick up a hunk of meat with your hands. But sometimes you still want to slice it for some reason.

I use a Verti-Grip knife. It's designed for folks with use of one hand. I hold it in my fist, rock it against the meat, and it cuts right through. It doesn't require you to brace what you're cutting with a fork. For a $14 gadget, it works really well.

Links

 

Pure Mind Magic

A few months back, German podcaster, magician, and mindset expert Victoria Mavis joined me to talk about the intersection between public speaking and magic on my other podcast, 2-Minute Talk Tips. You can find that interview at 2-MinuteTalkTips.com/magic.

During December, I had the pleasure of appearing on her show, Pure Mind Magic. We talked about speaking, sure, but much of the conversation was about my stroke story and the power of mindset in recovery. You can listen to it here or subscribe for free to Pure Mind Magic in your favorite podcast app

 

Where do we go from here?

 

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2019-01-08

Episode 095 -- Eye Connection and Meet George Hendley


2-Minute Tip: Make Eye Connection

 

Look them in the eye and make strong eye contact. It helps to make the audience feel more comfortable. To make that connection, though you need to hold the eye connection for 4-6 seconds. They will feel you are conversing with them rather than talking at them.

 

Pure Mind Magic

 

A few months back, German podcaster, magician, and mindset expert Victoria Mavis joined me to talk about the intersection between public speaking and magic. You can find that interview at 2MinuteTalkTips.com/magic.

 

During December, I had the pleasure of appearing on her show, Pure Mind Magic. We talked about speaking, sure, but much of the conversation was about my stroke story and the power of mindset in recovery. You can listen to it here or subscribe for free to Pure Mind Magic in your favorite podcast app.

 

Post Tip Discussion

 

 

I spoke with George Hendley from The Speakers Academy in Dallas. It was a great conversation about speaking, training, technology, and the way the field has changed over the years.

 

George Hendley HeadshotGeorge founded George Hendley Presentations, a training/coaching/consulting firm in 1992. His first 19 years was focused primarily on serving corporate clients from coast to coast. From 1997 until 2003 he delivered the Zig Ziglar Effective Business Presentations course over 20 times during a six year period. George was in a Dallas Toastmasters club for over 3 years and achieved the Certified Toastmasters recognition. Currently, The Speakers Academy, which George founded over 7 years ago has multiple locations around Dallas, each one meeting twice a month for open enrollment training and professional development coaching.

 

He has had an active leadership role in the American Society for Training and Development for over 20 years. He was a member of the National Speakers Association for 10 years and the International Coach Federation for 5 years and has held numerous leadership positions in both organizations on the local level. He has been an adjunct college teacher for 5 different courses over a period of 10 years. He continues to enjoy speaking in church events and on mission trips abroad for over 40 years.

 

As an authorized partner for Wiley Publishing (formerly Inscape Publishing and Carlson Learning) George has a rich and very successful career. In the last 24 years he has earned the Diamond award twice putting him the top 2% of all distributors in the world for sales volume of the DiSC profile and other related programs. He has lead dozens of seminars and workshops across the country for a wide variety of companies (including Fortune 500 companies) and still serves a variety of clients who appreciate his wisdom and experience with the tool.

 

During the past 26 years George authored over 150 articles on a variety of important topics. Those topics include Presentation skills, Listening, leadership and understanding body language as a form of communication. He posts frequent tips and insights on his Speakers Academy Facebook and LinkedIn page that are clear, brief and practical.

 

His zeal for learning and the desire to teach and mentor others makes him a passionate, enthusiastic and competent presenter.

 

Links

The  Speakers Academy The  Speakers Academy

www.TheSpeakersAcademy.com


The Speakers Academy on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/TheSpeakersAcademy/


George Hendley on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/georgehendleythespeakersacademy/


George Hendley on Twitter

https://twitter.com/George_Hendley


George Hendley Email

George@TheSpeakersAcademy.com


George Hendley

Phone 972.234.4377

  
The Speakers Academy on Meetup

https://www.meetup.com/The-Speakers-Academy/


Bill on Pure Mind Magic

https://victoriamavis.podbean.com/e/60-pmm-changing-your-brain-changing-your-body-wiht-bill-monroe/ 

 

 

 

Call to Action

 

  • Share your thoughts on George's perspective in the comments below
  • Check out George's site, The Speakers Academy, at http://thepeakersacademy.com
  • Share this episode with a friend, colleague, or relative with the link http://2minutetalktips.com/george
  • Use strong eye connections
  • Don't get best…get better

Check out this episode!

2019-01-04

Episode 047 -- How High Blood Pressure Causes Stroke


 

When I had my stroke at 46, it took a little while for the medical team to settle on the cause. I suppose that's a good thing. We don't want them to rush to a conclusion. Ultimately, they concluded the probable cause was a history of high blood pressure. It didn't make sense to me at the time.

In 2015 I developed high blood pressure, AKA hypertension, but I didn't know. That's the thing about high blood pressure -- it doesn't hurt. There was no pain.

I only found out because during the last week of December, I began have massive 30 minute pouring nosebleeds every other day. I checked my blood pressure on a home blood pressure machine, and it registered more than 200 over 160. That and the random surprise bleeding got me into the doctor's office. They measured my BP at 162/102. So it had dropped from apparently ER levels by that time.

Over the course of the next few months, we worked to get my BP under control through medication and some diet tweaks.

By March of 2016, my BP was coming in at 105/75.

Be February of 2017, it was down to 100/70.

And on June 3, 2017, I had my stroke.

Chart from heart.org showing levels of hypertension

I had serious high blood pressure for maybe a year to a year and a half. I had it under control for a year before my stroke. So how could previous high blood pressure cause a stroke?

This week, Dr. Nirav Shah, a neurologist at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle and the founder and CEO of Sentinel Healthcare, returns to Strokecast to answer that very question as we talk about just how high blood pressure causes stroke.

 

Bio

Dr. Nirav H Shah HeadshotDr. Nirav H. Shah is a fellowship trained neurologist and sub-specialist in cerebrovascular and stroke medicine with board certifications in: neurology, stroke medicine, carotid neurosonology, transcranial doppler ultrasound, and neuroimaging.

He is a practicing neurohospitalist and served as the stroke medical director at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. Academically, he is interested in emergent and critical care neurology research and is an associate editor for The Neurohospitalist, a peer-reviewed journal. He enjoys mentoring trainees and collaborating on publications and conference presentations.

Outside of clinical care Dr Shah is collaborating with experts to develop scalable technologies capable of ameliorating healthcare’s challenges. He consults with startups and investors to develop technologies and devices so that one day they are available to his patients. He has worked with companies to meet FDA regulations for approval as well as to help them understand the provider perspective of product-market fit.

Dr. Shah is also the CEO and Founder of Sentinel Healthcare. He is also a passionate traveler and photographer.

Hack of the Week

After I lost the use of my left arm, eating became a challenge for some dishes. Sushi was easy. Steak was difficult because to cut a steak, you need to hold it still with your fork and slice with the steak with the knife in your other hand.

So how do you manage this out at a restaurant? 

You've got a couple options. One, of course is to just skip cutting it, pick up the slab of meat with the one usable hand and start chowing down. Of course your dining companions may not prefer that choice.

The other option is incredibly simple. When you place your order, ask them to have the kitchen cut up the steak for you. 

That's it. It's a simple request that will take them just seconds and it solves your problem.

Links

Lipohyalinosis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipohyalinosis

C. Miller Fisher on Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._Miller_Fisher

C. Miller Fisher On AHA Journals

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.112.661512

Atherosclerosis on WebMD

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/arteriosclerosis-atherosclerosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20350569

Arteriosclerosis / atherosclerosis on Mayo Clinic

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/arteriosclerosis-atherosclerosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20350569

Lacunar Stroke on Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacunar_stroke

Lacunar Infarction and Small Vessel Disease: Pathology and Pathophysiology

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325635/

Effect of reducing blood pressure with medications immediately following ischemic stroke

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-effect-blood-pressure-medications-immediately.html

Blood Pressure-Lowering Treatment After Subacute Stroke to Prevent Recurrent Stroke, Major Vascular Events, and Dementia

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.023087?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed

Higher Blood Pressure May Be Linked to Brain Disease, Alzheimer’s

https://www.rush.edu/news/press-releases/higher-blood-pressure-may-be-linked-brain-disease-alzheimers

Nirav  on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/nirav-h-shah/

Nirav at Swedish

https://www.swedish.org/swedish-physicians/profile.aspx?name=nirav+h+shah&id=271893

Nirav on Twitter

http://twitter.com/NeuroNirav

The Neurohospitalist

http://journals.sagepub.com/home/nho

Nirav’s Photography

www.thoughtpotential.com

Where do we go from here?

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2019-01-01

Episode 094 -- Watch Yourself on Fast Forward and Speaker Resolutions for 2019


2-Minute Tip: Watch Yourself on Fast Forward

 

I met speaking coach and entrepreneur Emily Messner (AKA Sleevs) on the JoCo Cruise earlier this year and she told me about this tip.

 

Gestures are a complicated thing for many folks. Your gestures may or may not feel natural, but it's hard to tell how they look. We're not watching ourselves while we speak; we have higher priorities. So if we want to evaluate our gestures, video becomes our friend. With the proliferation of camera phones, there's no reason not to record more of our sessions. Of course, you have to actually watch the video you record to get value from it.

 

When it's time to evaluate your gestures, watch that video on fast forward. You'll see repetitive or annoying gestures really pop out in an almost comical way at high speed. They'll be obvious in a way that they might not at normal speed.

 

Then, with that information, you can make an educated decision about what to do.

 

Post Tip Discussion: Resolutions for Speakers

 

I'm posting on January 1, 2019, which means it's time to make New Years Resolutions. Rather than vague, grandiose resolutions that will be dust in a few weeks, here are 5 resolutions that will help speakers be more effective.  They are:

 

  1. Rehearse a talk 5 times
  2. Do one talk without 
  3. Solicit detailed feedback from one colleague
  4. Finish every talk on time
  5. Tell 3 stories in talks this year

 

Executing on theses resolutions will help you grow your skills, become more confident, and conduct more persuasive presentations.

 

Program Notes

 

I'm currently working on the editorial calendar for the rest of 2019. I've got a bunch of great interviews with speakers already lined up, and I've begun recording them. I'm already learning lots, and I hope you will, too.

 

As I go forward, I do want to make sure I'm providing the value you need. So, please do me a favor and let me know what you think of the show. What do you want to see more of? What do you want to see less of? You can let me know in one of 4 ways -- whichever is easiest for you:

 

 

Call To Action

 

  • Let me know what you think of the show
  • Adopt 5 resolutions for public speakers to grow your effectiveness
  • Watch yourself on video on fast forward
  • Teach a colleague how to subscribe to podcasts
  • Don't get best...get better

 

 

2-Minute Talk Tips is the public speaking podcast that help you become a more effective speaker in as little as 2 minutes a week.

Check out this episode!

2018-12-28

Episode 046 -- 2018 Top 10 Stroke Hacks


This is the last episode of the year, and it's a little different. I'm sharing my 10 favorite hacks of the weeks for the year.

Special thanks to Emilee Mason, Kristen Dingman, the folks from the Slow Road to Better, and Whitney Morean for their contributions. And thanks to all the guests who joined me and generously shared their stories in 2018

Before we get to the hacks, I want to share a story from Doctor Who. In the episode Heaven Sent, which is one of the best episodes the show has ever released, the lead character, The Doctor, a time-travelling super smart alien, finds himself stuck in some sort of prison. He has to gradually work his way out. Eventually, he figures out how, and he tells a story created by the Brothers Grimm about a bird:

The Brothers Grimm, lovely fellas. They're on my darts team. According to them, there's this emperor and he asks this shepherd's boy, how many seconds in eternity?

And the shepherd's boy says, there's this mountain of pure diamond. It takes an hour to climb it, and an hour to go around it!

Every hundred years, a little bird comes and sharpens its beak on the diamond mountain. And when the entire mountain is chiseled away, the first second of eternity will have passed!

You must think that's a hell of a long time.

Personally, I think that's a hell of a bird.

Stroke recovery is a long, slow process, and sometimes it feels like an eternity.

As a stroke survivor you are not the mountain. You are the bird. And you are a hell of a bird.

The Hacks

Program Notes

You may notice a slight echo in my intro and outro. I'm producing this episode from Currently Speaking Studios East (AKA my mother's guest bedroom) and experimenting with a different setup.

Also, for those who are curious, the sound clip between hacks is the sound of a Kodak slide projector changing slides -- the non-PowerPoint variety.

[caption id="attachment_524" align="alignnone" width="169"]A small stuffed penguin looks at a microphone Miles (http://traveling-penguin.blogspot.com/) considers starting his own podcast. He fell behind on his blog so he's also considering Instagram to chronicle his adventures, He's a busy bird[/caption]

Where do we go from here?

  • What are your favorite tips for living with disabilities? Go ahead and tell us in the comments below.
  • Do you know anyone who might find these tips helpful? Share this episode with them by giving them the link http://strokecast.com/2018hacks 
  • Subscribe for free in your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode.
  • Don't get best…get better

Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2018-12-25

Episode 093 -- 18 Public Speaking Tips


2018 has been a great year for 2-Minute Talk Tips, and I got to talk with some amazing people from around the world for the show, This week, I pull together the initial tip from each guest into a single episode. If you want to listen to the whole episode each tip came from or explore the guest's background, click in the link below.

 

Episode

 Guest

Tip

62

Iszi Lawrence

Tell a story

66

Mario Porreca

Practice in the shower

68

Melanie Childers

Raise Your Energy

69

Pradeepa Narayanaswami

3 Tips for stage comfort

70

Melissa Bird

Find Your Fire

73

Catie Harris

Connect with your audience

75

Victoria Mavis

Write down your thoughts

76

Louise Brogan

Make eye contact

77

Patricia Missakian

Influence one person

78

Hilary Billings

Focus on feeling

79

Denise Vaughan

Know you can do it

80

Diana Wink

Thread a story through your talk

81

Bilal Moin

Be alive

87

Scott Charlston

Choose your headline

89

Andrew 'Mecha' Davis

Practice in the mirror

90

Donnie Boivin

Get on stage

91

Philip Andrew

Describe your audience

92

Greet your audience

Dave Jackson

 

Call to Action 

 

  • What has been your favorite tip from the show this year? Let us know in the comments below.
  • Do you think these tips are helpful? Share this episode on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, or the social media platform of your choice with the link http://2minutetalktips.com/2018tips
  • Check out full episodes from the links in the table above
  • Don't get best...get better

 

 

2-Minute Talk Tips is the public speaking podcast that help you become a more effective speaker in as little as 2 minutes a week.

Check out this episode!

2018-12-21

Episode 045 -- Meet the Stromies


Angie Jorgensen, Sarah Conaway, and Tamsen Butler are the Stromies -- The Stroke Homies. They are 3 stroke survivors brought together by this life threatening event many of us went through. They started a blog to share their stories in February 2018. It started simply, and other survivors followed. Then other survivors shared their stories.

Dozens and dozens of survivors are now featured on the blog supporting their own recoveries by sharing their experiences and empowering readers looking to make a connection.

The Stromie energy is a force. And it's just getting started.

Group shot of Stromie Sarah, Stromie Angie, and Stromie TamsenI connected with the Stromies from my home office in Seattle while they met up at a coffee shop in Omaha, NB. Sometimes it still amazes me that technology allows this to happen.

Stromie Sarah is a busy mom and speaker. A survivor of both stroke and Lupus, her amazing recovery story provides hope for others.

Stromie Tamsen is a mom, certified fitness instructor, and award-winning author. Her massive stroke at age 41 was unexpected and life-changing.

Stromie Angie is a mom and certified fitness instructor. In 2012 she was in a coma, suffered a stroke and found out she had a rare kind of cancer called a pheochromocytoma. Her amazing recovery continues to inspire the people around her.

Hack of the Week

The Stromies gives us two Hacks this week. 

Stromie Angie says to look for one good thing every day.

We all deal with trauma and the fallout from a stoke we or a loved one had, and it can be easy to spiral into a dark place. It's helpful to recognize that there are still good things around us. There is good in the world.

I would add that it's helpful to write that down every day. Record one good thing a day. Or post it on social media. Go back from time to time and look at this list of good things. Because sometimes we all need a reminder.

Stromie Tamsen add that visualization is a powerful tool in recovery. Imagine a deer trying to get to the middle of a corn field. That deer may struggle to get any result the first time it tries. The next time, it may get a little further, and the next time, further still. Each time it's simpler and easier to go a certain distance because that deer has been wearing down a path. Eventually that deer makes it to the center.

That's neuroplasticity. Each rep you do of an exercise is one more corn stalk bent out of the way. It's a little bit more of a neuro-pathway. Do enough reps over time, and you, can get to the center of the field.

Links

Stromies

http://stromices.com

Stromies on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/stromies/

Stromies on Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/three_stromies/

Stromies on Twitter

https://twitter.com/ThreeStromies

Sarah's email

StromieSarah@stromies.com

Tamsen's email

StromieTamsen@stromies.com

Angie's email

StromieAngie@stromies.com

Tamsen's author page on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Tamsen-Butler/e/B002I4QC7Q/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1545382537&sr=8-1

American Heart Association

https://heart.org

American Heart Association -- Omaha

https://www.heart.org/en/affiliates/nebraska/omaha

American Heart Association -- Seattle

https://www.heart.org/en/affiliates/washington/puget-sound

Stromies on the AHA

https://supportnetwork.heart.org/survivor-stories/meet-the-stromies-stroke-homies/

ECMO for Adults

http://respiratory-care-sleep-medicine.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/ECMO-A-Last-Chance-At-Life.aspx

Kcentra info

https://www.kcentra.com/

 

Where do we go from here?

  • Check out stromies.com to learn more about the Stromies and read the amazing stories of survival, recovery, and thriving
  • Connect with one or more of the Stromies via social media or email, and share your story. You can find all those links above
  • Share this episode with someone you think might appreciate the Stromie story by giving them the link http://strokecast.com/stromies
  • Visualize a cornfield as part of your recovery
  • Find one good thing every day, whether or not you had a stroke
  • Don't get best…get better

 

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2018-12-18

Episode 092 -- Greet Your Audience and Meet Dave Jackson


 

2-Minute Tip: Greet Your Audience

 

A lot of speakers pace back stage or pound coffee or try to deal with nerves in other ways before going out to speak. 

 

Instead, go out into the audience as folks are arriving, and greet audience members. Have a brief chat to get to know folks. This accomplishes a few things.

 

  • It gives you something to do and gets you out of your own head
  • It gives you information you can leverage in your talk to better connect with the audience while you speak
  • It gives you a friendly face to look out at from the stage
  • It let's an audience member feel heard and gives them a favorable impression of you

 

 

Post Tip Discussion: Meet Dave Jackson

 

About 10 years ago, my team and I were looking at ways to integrate this brand new podcasting thing into our corporate training and brand evangelism efforts. I was already a fan of the medium, so I started listening to podcasts about podcasting to figure out how we could do it. Ultimately, I turned most of that project over to Tim Garber who appeared on this show way back in episodes 10 and 11 and who you can still hear at the end of every episode today.

 

But all that is how I found with Dave Jackson whispering in my ear from the School of Podcasting as I tried to find my way to a taxi at the Philadelphia airport in 2008.

 

I've been a fan of Dave's work and all he's done for this medium for a long time, and I'm thrilled to have him on the show today.

 

One of the most important lessons in this chat is that while Dave is an experienced speaker, he still gets nervous before a talk. And then he does the talk anyway. He also still takes the time to rehearse, practice out loud, and try the stage before folks come in.

 

There's a lot more in today's conversation, too.

 

So who is Dave?

 

Dave Jackson Headshot

Dave Jackson started experimenting with audio on the Internet in 2004. In 2005 he launched his first podcast and soon launched the School of Podcasting (the Internet's first site dedicated to helping people learn the right way). His accomplishments include:

 

  • 3.2 Million Downloads
  • 3044 Episodes
  • Director of Podcasting for the New Media Expo
  • Featured Speaker at Podcast Movement 2014- 2018
  • Featured and Keynote Speaker at Podcast Mid Atlantic and Podfest Orlando
  • 2018 Inducted into the Academy of Podcasters Hall of Fame

 

 

Unlike many other “geeks” who know how to podcast, Dave's been a technical trainer for over 20 years. This means he not only understands the technology but can explain it in a plain English “geek-speak free” environment. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Education from the University of Akron (Specializing in technical education). While there are other podcast consultants, Dave believes his experience sets him apart in regards to helping folks make sense of the entire podcasting process. He not only help with the “how,” but  also explains the why, and makes sure new podcasters avoid common podcasting pitfalls. Dave's won awards at fortune 500 companies for hi customer service. In a nutshell, he cares.

 

A Video Interlude

 

[embed]https://youtu.be/SSQEEEvrxU8[/embed]

 

[embed]https://youtu.be/P5qdfTIrOw8?t=442[/embed]

 

 

Links

 

School of Podcasting

http://schoolofpodcasting.com

Dave Jackson's other Shows

http://PowerOfPodcasting.com

Dave on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/podcastcoach

Dave on Twitter

https://twitter.com/learntopodcast

Dave on YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/user/personalpodcastcoach

Thinkific Online Training

https://www.thinkific.com/

School of Podcasting with Cathy Heller

http://schoolofpodcasting.com/the-courage-to-make-mediocre-things-cathy-heller-from-dont-keep-your-day-job/

Academy of Podcasters Hall of Fame

http://academyofpodcasters.com/hall-of-fame/

FocusRite scarlett 2i2

https://focusrite.com/usb-audio-interface/scarlett/scarlett-2i2

Applying ADDIE to Public Speaking (2-Minute Talk Tips Episode 041)

http://2minutetalktips.com/2017/12/19/episode-041-listen-actively-and-apply-the-addie-model-to-public-speaking/

Talk Like Ted Book Review

(2-Minute Talk Tips Episode 005)

http://2minutetalktips.com/2017/01/24/episode-005-arriving-the-day-before-and-a-revew-of-talk-like-ted-by-carmine-gallo/

Tim Garber Part 1

(2-Minute Talk Tips Episode 010)

http://2minutetalktips.com/2017/02/28/episode-010-parallel-structure-and-tim-garber-part-1/

Tim Garber Part 2

(2-Minute Talk Tips Episode 011)

http://2minutetalktips.com/2017/03/07/episode-011-record-yourself-and-tim-garber-part-2/

Secrets of Dynamic Communication by Ken Davis

https://www.amazon.com/Secrets-Dynamic-Communications-Prepare-Deliver/dp/0849921902/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1545036770&sr=1-1&keywords=secrets+of+dynamic+communication

 

Call To  Action

 

  • What did you hear from Dave today? Let us know in the comments below.
  • Check out Dave's School of Podcasting if you're thinking of starting a show or just want to learn more about the insides of a podcast
  • Next time you're speaking, greet the early arriving audience members personally.
  • Share this episode with anyone thinking of starting a show by giving them the link http://2minutetalktips.com
  • Subscribe to 2-Minute Talk Tips for free in your favorite podcast app
  • Don't get best…get better

Check out this episode!

2018-12-14

Episode 044 -- Meet CEO Lana Malovana and Raccoon.Recovery


Raccoon.Recovery device on handI'm sure you're shocked to know that I love technology. And it's not just because I've spent a career in the industry. It's because these tools have the power to change lives. It's one reason I was thrilled to talk to Lana Malovana, the CEO of European Startup Raccoon.Recovery about their device and platform to support stroke recovery through video games.

Raccoon Recovery originally made controllers for video games and VR. The genesis for the controller we talk about today was in 2016 when one of their engineers injured his hand and couldn't do his regular work. He moved to a testing role and his PT was blown away by the progress he made by using the controller at work. Raccoon made the pivot to rehab devices following meetings at TechCrunch in 2017. Lana will tell us more about that story.

Another point we talk about is one that comes up here when we talk about therapy goal, or on my other podcast, 2-Minute Talk Tips, where we talk about benefits. Effective therapy isn't about achieving a certain level of motion or degree of rotation with patients. It's about empowering patients to do something with that motion -- to get the benefit from it. To drink from a glass of water, buckle a seatbelt, draw a sword, or play a game.

One of my OTs frequently reminded me that neuroplasticity is great, and making those neuroplastic connections will ultimately require thousands of repetition. Thousands.

And video games make those thousands of repetitions possible.

The big thing that's happening among the tech gear I've talked about on the show, like the NeoFect Rapael Smart Glove and the blood pressure monitoring solution from Sentinel Healthcare, is that it's not about the Device itself. It's about the platform. It's about communicating more effectively with a care team. It's about using the data the device generates and collects to help the medical team make more effective recommendations to the patient, and to pool data in such a way that machine learning algorithms can drive even better treatment in the future.

Raccoon Recovery Device to Tablet illustration

It's now December 2018 and Raccoon Recovery's device is going through testing and validation. They hope to have it on the market next year.

Bio

Svitlana Malovana HeadsgotSvitlana Malovana is a co-founder of Raccoon.World and an IT and robotics enthusiast with more than 6 years of experience in company scale up and management.

She is also the founder of Olans Group, the first startup-oriented legal & business consulting company in Ukraine. While being CEO and a practical lawyer at Olans Group, Lana dealt with medical companies including ArtoMed and Cardiomo as well as hardware and software startups like Arqa Technologies, Paybeam, PRODBOARD, and SmartSport, in the Ukrainian, EU and USA markets.

Lana studied the details of emerging businesses and, being a huge fan of technologies, founded Raccoon.World.

As an enthusiast of returning people with disabilities to society, Lana studied the ways of psycho emotional and physical rehabilitation for people with disabilities during the international Zwischenland course by Deutch-Polnisches Jugenwerk.

When the anti-terrorist operation in Ukraine began, she voluntarily provided legal services for the “Return alive!” Public Organization and Handicap Foundations that were engaged in fundraising, the supply of medicines, and the recovery of people after returning home.

Lana is an alumni of numerous business programs, including YC School, SABIT, Crowd Inc. and the Startupbootcamp Digital Health (Berlin) Accelerator.

Combining strong entrepreneurial skills, deep knowledge in emerging business management, and knowledge about rehabilitation for people with disabilities, Lana initiated and headed the new pivot for Raccoon.World – gaming solution to rehabilitation with Raccoon.Recovery.

 

Hack of the Week

One thing that can be tough is putting on a belt. Reaching all the way to my affected side belt loops with my strong arm while trying to not knock myself over and balance appropriately while standing is tough. If I was still in a wheel chair it would have been even harder.

The solution I landed on was inspired by JC Penney trousers I got in the 80s. They came with a belt already threaded! My reaction at the time was "Cool! Free belt!"

The trick to putting on a belt now with hemiparesis is to thread the belt through the belt loops before I put on the pants. It's a simple solution, but it works.

Links

Lana Malovana on Twitter

https://twitter.com/SvitlanaMalovan

Lana Malovana on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/svitlana-lana-malovana-01006659/

Lana Malovana on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/svitlana.malovana

Raccoon Recovery

https://rehab.raccoon.world/

Raccoon Recovery on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/Raccoon.Recovery

Raccoon Recovery on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/company/raccoonworld/

Raccoon Recovery on Twitter

https://twitter.com/raccoon_world

Raccoon Recovery Email

info@raccoon.world

World Health Organization (WHO)

https://www.who.int/

WHO on Stroke

https://www.who.int/topics/cerebrovascular_accident/en/

Where do we go from here?

  • Checkout Raccoon.Revery to learn more about their rehab solution, and reach out to Raccoon Recovery via social media or email with any questions you might have. You can find those links above.
  • Do you know anyone with an interest in technology, startups, or rehab? Share this episode with them by encouraging them to visit http://strokecast.com/raccoon
  • Subscribe to Strokecast in your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode
  • Don't get best…get better

 

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2018-12-11

Episode 091 -- Describe your Audience and Meet Phillip Andrew


 

2-Minute Tip: Describe your Audience

 

Back in 2008,  Best Buy described 4 personae who represented their target customers. The even started designing different stores to appeal to Buzz, Barry, Ray, or Jill. They had detailed descriptions for theses archetypes.

 

I'm not sure if it's the best approach for a big-box retailer, but it can help your talks.

 

It's important to understand your target audience. Start by describing the one person you wan to reach. Who are they? What do they do? What do they wear? Where do they work? What is family like? Why do they need to hear your message? What will happen to them if they don't heed your call to action?

 

This exercise provides a useful framework for understanding your audience and tuning to message to maximize it's effectiveness. After all, it's hard to tell a story when you don't know who you're telling it to.

 

Post Tip Discussion: Meet Phillip Andrew

 

Phillip Andrew is a speaker and TV producer with a special interest in the youth market. And he is a delight to talk to. I wanted go even deeper into a whole bunch of areas, but this would have been a 5 hour episode.

 

As it is we covered topics as far ranging as:

  • The impact of YouTube on speakers
  • The variety of kids a speaker must address
  • And the value The value of coaching

 

Plus, did you ever wonder what a TV producer does? Phillip Tells us.

 

Overall, Phillip is just an engaging conversationalist who brings tremendous energy to everything he does.

 

Phillip Andrew headsot

Phillip Andrew is a speaker, author, media coach, Emmy-Nominated TV producer, DJ and more. Based in Los Angeles, he travels around the country educating and encouraging High School and College Students through high energy entertainment and unforgettable storytelling. He's passionate about educating, entertaining, and connecting with people in a way that encourages, empowers, and provokes insight.

 

He began drinking at age 11 and lost his mother in High School. Today, he lives a life in recovery, speaking with kids about overcoming addiction, surviving the loss of a parent, and how learning to take ownership over his life and became a catalyst for the positive change that helped him create a life he is proud of today.

 

 

 

Links

 

Phillip Andrew Website

http://phillipandrew.co

Phillip's Email

phillipandrewla@gmail.com

Phillip on Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/phillipandrewla/

Philip on Twitter

https://twitter.com/PhillipAndrewLA

Philip on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/phil.barbb

Philip on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/philbarbb/

Philip's Blog

https://www.phillipandrew.co/blog

 

Call To Action

 


Check out this episode!

2018-12-07

Episode 043 -- Telemedicine and Sentinel Healthcare


 

Tracking Blood Pressure

After my stroke (and before my stroke, too) I'm supposed to monitor my blood pressure regularly. That means I have to:

  • Put the cuff on my arm
  • Relax while it reads the data
  • Record the data on my log
  • Print off my log when I go see the doctor every few months

Seems simple, right?

Well here's where it gets complicated.

Because my left arm was affected by the stroke, I can't get reliable blood pressure there. Tone, spasticity, occasional edema, lack of use, and variable circulation mean the results are less accurate.

That means, I have to put the cuff on my right arm to get a reading. Have you ever tried to scratch your right elbow with your right hand? Yeah. You can see the challenge.

As I've gotten a little more left arm use back, I can kind of get the cuff in place by also using my teeth. That involves frustration, effort, and all sorts of movement. You know what that does? Yup. It raises my blood pressure.

When The GF is around, she can place the cuff which helps.

Of course that's best in the summer. In the winter, I'm wearing fleece or sweaters. And I don't want to take them off. So now I'm less likely to take a reading.

When I do take a reading during the day and log it, great. That data may be helpful in another 6 months.

But what if there was a better way?

Sentinel Healthcare

Long time listeners will be happy to welcome neurologist and Sentinel Healthcare CEO Dr. Nirav Shah back to the show. Nirav and Sentinel have that better way.

In Sentinel's solution, a patient uses a highly accurate wrist cuff blood pressure reader to take a reading, which transmits via Bluetooth to their iPhone and into a secure platform that gets that data to the care team. It solves the problems above while creating a bigger data-set to provide better care for the patient.

This week, I talk with Nirav about telemedicine in general and about what he and Sentinel are doing to pair telemedicine with blood pressure management to help patients receive better care while making it easy to comply with doctors' post-hospital instructions

Bio

Dr. Nirav H Shah HeadshotDr. Nirav H. Shah is a fellowship trained neurologist and sub-specialist in cerebrovascular and stroke medicine with board certifications in: neurology, stroke medicine, carotid neurosonology, transcranial doppler ultrasound, and neuroimaging.

He is a practicing neurohospitalist and served as the stroke medical director at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. Academically, he is interested in emergent and critical care neurology research and is an associate editor for The Neurohospitalist, a peer-reviewed journal. He enjoys mentoring trainees and collaborating on publications and conference presentations.

Outside of clinical care Dr Shah is collaborating with experts to develop scalable technologies capable of ameliorating healthcare’s challenges. He consults with startups and investors to develop technologies and devices so that one day they are available to his patients. He has worked with companies to meet FDA regulations for approval as well as to help them understand the provider perspective of product-market fit.

Dr. Shah is also the CEO and Founder of Sentinel Healthcare. He is also a passionate traveler and photographer.

Links

Sentinel Healthcare

http://www.sentinel.healthcare/

Sentinel Healthcare launches platform to fill gaps between IoT devices and doctors' offices

https://www.geekwire.com/2018/sentinel-healthcare-launches-platform-fill-gaps-iot-devices-doctors-offices/

 

 

Hypertension costly to patients, society

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-hypertension/hypertension-costly-to-patients-society-idUSKBN1J72MB

Apple unveils Watch Series 4 with FDA-approved ECG

https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/apple-unveils-watch-series-4-fda-approved-ecg

Nirav’s previous appearances

http://strokecast.com/nirav

Nirav on Stem Cells and Stroke Recovery

http://strokecast.com/stemcells

Nirav  on LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/nirav-h-shah/

Nirav at Swedish

https://www.swedish.org/swedish-physicians/profile.aspx?name=nirav+h+shah&id=271893

Nirav on Twitter

http://twitter.com/NeuroNirav

The Neurohospitalist

http://journals.sagepub.com/home/nho

Nirav’s Photography

www.thoughtpotential.com

Hack of the Week -- Bring Joy to your Rehab Team

As a survivor, do you like the work your inpatient team did? Did they help you walk or eat or speak again? If you haven't talked with them since leaving the hospital, the Holiday season is a great time to send a note or card.

Once patients leave their care, most inpatient OT, PT, Speech Therapists, and others never hear more. If you want to brighten their day send an email or physical note, or visit the rehab unit them how you're doing. They love to hear from their alumni and to celebrate the progress you've made.

A card or note is a simple, low cost gift for the Holiday (or really any) season.

Where do we go from here?

  • Check out Sentinel Healthcare's website to learn more about the product and solution 
  • Send a message to your rehab team and let them know how you're doing
  • Subscribe to Strokecast for free in your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode
  • Don't get best…get better

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast

2018-12-04

Episode 090 -- Get on Stage and Meet Donnie Boivin


 

2-Minute Tip: Get on Stage More

 

Ultimately, the most important way to get better as a speaker is to speak more. Find more stages and get on them. Reach out to local clubs and service organizations who are always looking for speakers in your community. Theses gigs may not pay anything, but especially when you're starting out as a professional speaker, you need to get in the stage time. And then you need repeat that. Get more stage time to refine your craft and develop your skills.

 

Post Tip Discussion: Meet Success Coach Donnie Boivin

 

My conversation with Donnie covered a huge range of topics, including things like defining success, the power of having a podcast, and how to treat chickens with birth defects. What really comes through is the intense, joyful energy Donnie brings to everything that he does. It's a bit of a long episode because every time I thought about cutting something, that conversation would quickly veer into a delightful or fascinating area.

 

I think many of the things Donnie said will be bouncing around in my skull for some time to come.

 

On a slight tangent, Donnie mentions Napoleon Hill's book, Think and Grow Rich. It's also a book I heard come up on the Pure Mind Magic Podcast and the Cliff Ravenscraft Show on episodes I listened to over the past week. I think I heard it mentioned on another podcast, too. I guess that's the universe's way of telling me it's time to read it. To the library!

Donnie Boivin headshot

But back to Donnie

 

 

Donnie Boivin is a former Marine turned sales rep turned National Sales Trainer Turned speaker podcaster, and success coach. He challenges success minded people,  and entrepreneurs to tackle their fears and find success that they know is there.. His no-nonsense "Jarhead Gentle" style inspires people to take action and grow.  Combining his story with those of everyday people who have faced challenges in life, he helps audiences reach their goals.

 

He coaches speakers, entrepreneurs, and more to reach success however they define it. In his podcast, Donnie's Success Champions, he celebrates Ordinary People, Entrepreneurs, Veterans, First Responders, Business Owners and visionaries that have a story to tell. These champions are pure awesome plain and simple.

 

Links

 

Donnie Boivin Website

https://www.donnieboivin.com/

Donnie on twitter

https://twitter.com/donnieboivin

Donnie's Success Champions Podcast

http://www.thesuccesschamp.com/

Donnie's Success Champs Website

http://successchamps.us

Donnie in Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/donnie.boivin/

Donnie on Patreon

https://www.patreon.com/SuccessChampions

Chickens Chickens Chickens

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ChickensChickensChickens/

Donnie's Success Champions on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SuccessChampion/

Think and Grow Rich on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Think-Grow-Rich-Landmark-Bestseller/dp/1585424331

 

Call To Action

 

  • Be sure to check out donnieboivin.com to learn more about Donnie and how you can work with him. 
  • Share this episode with a colleague by telling them to go to http://2minutetalktips.com/donnie.
  • Subscribe to 2-Minute Talk Tips for free in your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode.
  • Don't get best…get better.

 

 

 

 


Check out this episode!

2018-11-30

Episode 042 -- Meet Dr. Dileep Yavagal


In Episode 035 back in October, I talk with Dr. Nirav Shah about the general state of stem cell therapy for stroke survivors. Afterwards, Nirav connected me with the lead researcher on the University of Miami's stem cell research team, Dr. Dileep Yavagal so I could talk to him about his research. That brings us to today's episode.

Dr. Yavagal specializes in vascular neurosurgery. That includes procedures like thrombectomy, where a doctor inserts a catheter into a blood vessel in the groin to go up into the brain a pull out the clot. Mechanical thrombectomy can be done up to 24 hours after stroke symptoms begin, and it can have a tremendous impact on minimizing the damage from an ischemic stroke.

What it doesn't do today is help patients recover from stroke. It means fewer brain cells die, but the dead and damaged ones don't get any help. When we say time is tissue or time is brain, this is why. Every minute that a clot blocks a vessel, more brain dies. To recover functionality today, we rely on neuroplasticity. PT, OT, Speech therapy, home exercises, eStim, SSRIs, acupuncture, and more therapies are all about encouraging the brain to rewire in such a way that we can work around that dead spot in our heads.

But what if there was another way?

That's the question stem cell therapy tries to answer.

Stem cells, as you may recall from my chat with Nirav, are cells that can become other cells. Embryonic stem cell are the ones we here about in the news, but not the ones used in the trials today. These are critical in embryos because those stem cells turn into all the other cells in our bodies -- nerves, muscle, brain, heart, left pinky, etc.

Adults have stem cells, too. The most common source is our bone marrow -- the soft tissue inside our bones where the body actually creates blood. Research is now looking at how we can use the stem cells to drive the growth of fresh neurons in the brain.

There are two major approaches in the research, today. The Stanford study demonstrated the safety of its procedure in a small study, but more work is being done to test the effectiveness. That process focused on chronic stroke survivors -- those several years post stroke. In that study, researches a hole in the skull to inject the patient's own stem cells into the damaged area. Results are preliminary, but promising.

Dr. Yavagal's work at the University of Miami is different in several ways. First, his work is focused on using stem cell therapy within the first day or two of the onset of symptoms. Secondly, his work relies on donor stem cells since the patient's own stem cells are not available in quantity right after the stroke. Third, his procedure involves delivering the cells to the brain through a catheter, similar to that used during thrombectomy or used to repair an aneurysm. His results are also quite prom, and he's preparing the next phase of study to move the science along and develop safe, effective treatments.

The key question we always ask is, "When will this therapy be available?"

The answer is we are not there today, despite the clinics popping up claiming to offer the therapy. However, it appears we are 2-3 years out if things go well, or potentially 4-5 years out if they don't.

In addition to his work with stem cells, Dr. Yavagal is also one of the leaders of the Thrombectomy 2020 program -- an international initiative to reach 202,000 thrombectomies a year by 2020 and to continue doubling after that. There are communities in the US and around the world where this therapy is simple not available, and yet it can be such an extremely powerful way of reducing the disability caused by stroke, saving hundreds of thousands of people from having to deal with the deficits of stroke and saving billions of dollars in healthcare and disability expenses. We'll talk more about Thrombectomy 2020 in a future episode.

Who is Dr. Dileep Yavagal?

Dr. Yavagal headshotDr. Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAHA, FAAN, FSVIN is the Director of Interventional Neurology and Co-Director of Neuroendovascular Surgery at the University of Miami & Jackson Memorial Hospitals and Clinical Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at the University of Miami School of Medicine. He has recently been appointed to lead the Neurological Cell Therapy Platform at the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University.

Dr. Yavagal is an international thought leader in endovascular therapy for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke as well as a pioneer in the translation of intra-arterial delivery of cell therapy for stroke. He was the national Co-PI of the first US multicenter clinical trial of Intra-arterial delivery of autologous bone marrow stem cells for ischemic stroke: RECOVER Stroke. He was on the on the steering committee of the SWIFT-Prime and MR RESCUE, both landmark randomized clinical trials of endovascular stroke therapy. He co-authored the landmark 2015 AHA Endovascular Stroke Therapy Guidelines as well as the recent groundbreaking DAWN stroke trial in the New England Journal of Medicine. He is the founder and Past-President of the Society for Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN). He has also co-authored the AHA Policy statement on Stroke Systems of Care.

Dr. Yavagal has received several state and federal research grants to study endovascular stem cell therapies for ischemic stroke using small and large animal models of stroke in his research laboratory. He is considered a pioneering researcher the field of intra-arterial delivery of stem cells in stroke therapy.

Hack of the Week

As we head into the gift giving season, we have to start thinking about how to wrap presents. Wrapping paper is great when you have 2 functional hands or you use some sort of gift-wrapping service. If you have just one functional hand, it can be more challenging. You can find videos on YouTube demonstrating one-handed techniques, but I prefer the simpler way.

Gift Bags!

Seriously, make it easy on yourself and uses theses fancy mini shopping bags. Add some tissue paper to the bag, put the gift in, the lightly crumble some more tissue paper to put on top. Then you're done. If you're feeling really ambitious, you can tie the handles together with ribbon.

Links

Dileep Yavagal on Twitter

https://twitter.com/dyavagal

University of Miami Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute

http://www.med.miami.edu/isci/

University of Miami Department of Neurology

http://neurology.med.miami.edu/

Stem Cells: A Breakthrough in Stroke Treatment?

http://med.miami.edu/news/stem-cells-a-breakthrough-in-stroke-treatment

SWIFT-Prime study

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01657461

Thrombectomy 2020

https://www.svin.org/i4a/headlines/headlinedetails.cfm?id=37

Dr. Seth Finklestein

https://www.massgeneral.org/doctors/doctor.aspx?id=16597

Stroke Episode 035 — Stem Cell Therapy and Stroke Recovery

http://strokecast.com/2018/10/12/episode-035-stem-cell-therapy-and-stroke-recovery/

Strokecast Episode 040 — Meet Dr. Kimberly Brown

http://strokecast.com/2018/11/16/episode-040-meet-dr-kimberly-brown/

Clinical Trials

http://clinicaltrials.gov

PubMed

http://pubmed.com

Stanford Stem Cell Study Announcement

https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/06/stem-cells-shown-safe-beneficial-for-chronic-stroke-patients.html

Where do we go from here?

 

Strokecast is the stroke podcast where a Gen X stroke survivor explores rehab, recovery, the frontiers of neuroscience and one-handed banana peeling by helping stroke survivors, caregivers, medical providers and stroke industry affiliates connect and share their stories.


Here is the latest episode of The Strokecast